Justice Starts with God

During the panel discussion on Justice,[1] Don Carson asks

“What are the biblical texts and theological themes that should most control our thinking about justice and righteousness issues in our lives, in the church, in the time and place in the world where God has placed us?”[2]

Tim Keller, Voddie Baucham and Thabite Anyabwile all start with The imago Dei, that is, the Bible’s teaching that we are made in God’s image. Keller notes that this means that God holds us responsible for taking life, that we “should not speak abusively” of others and that “God even holds animals responsible for killing a human being.”[3]

Then Anyabwile and John Piper take it up a level and say something absolutely vital to our understanding of justice. Anyabwile says Continue reading

The Big Question- Why Does God allow suffering?

This is probably the biggest and the most challenging of our “Big Questions.” It’s big because it raises philosophical questions about God’s goodness (love, wisdom etc.) and his greatness (sovereignty, omnipresence, omniscience, omnipotence).

–          Why do good things happen to bad people?

–          How can a God of love tolerate suffering?

–          God is sovereign -can’t stop the suffering

If God is a God of love and a sovereign God then why doesn’t he stop the suffering now?

But it’s also challenging because it’s pastoral.  We are not just asking hypothetical questions. It’s personal: “Why me?” or “Why those I care about?” Continue reading

Why we should sing that “on the cross … the wrath of God was satisfied”

Not everyone likes Stuart Townend’s hymn “In Christ Alone.” Some people have a particular problem with the lyrics

“On that Cross as Jesus died, the wrath of God was satisfied.” Continue reading

The Truth about God – and why it matters

As well as opinion articles, leadership tips, book reviews and sermon notes, over time on faithroots.net we’ve been looking  the big questions about God, Creation, Humanity and New Creation. We do this because what we believe affects how we live. This means that the big doctrinal questions are important.

We are now coming to the end of our series on “Who is God?”  So this is a good opportunity to stop and sum up the practical implications of what we believe about Him. Continue reading

How important exactly am I? -when we demand too much in friendships

And now to Precosia.  In some respects, I find this the saddest of all the scenarios we have looked at.  Why do I say that? It’s not to diminish the seriousness of the other situations. However, I think that generally speaking we are more likely to get what is stake with the other ones.[1] When it comes to friends falling out, we may well underestimate the damage it does to congregations: unity is broken, ministries are disrupted and witness is compromised. Continue reading

The Same God or Different? (Part 2)

“Surely we all worship the same God don’t we?” This is another perspective on the “Which  God?” debate. Is it right for Christians to think of other religions (especially Abrahamic ones) as having essentially the same God. Continue reading

The same God or Different? (Part 1)

If it walks like a duck, sounds like a duck and looks like a duck…. it probably is a duck.

So, when we talk about people believing in a god, do they essentially believe in the same thing? This question has two aspects. On the one hand it can be seen as supporting pluralism and interfaith movements. “We all worship the same God.” On the other hand, it may support the atheist and the agnostic position – all your gods are equally ridiculous and without proof.

This links to our earlier posts about different gods.  What we have seen is that the choice in the end comes down to two options. You either believe that this World is made by a sovereign, eternal, personal God would is transcendent and immanent, or you don’t.

Continue reading