The media’s test question gets flunked again

So after Tim Farron and Jacob Rees-Mogg, it was Justin Welby’s turn.  Alistair Campbell asked him if he thought gay sex was a sin for an interview with GQ magazine.

Welby responds

“I don’t do blanket condemnation and I haven’t got a good answer to the question. I’ll be really honest about that. I know I haven’t got a good answer to the question. Inherently, within myself, the things that seem to me to be absolutely central are around faithfulness, stability of relationships and loving relationships.” Continue reading

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Here we go again

After the General Election witch hunt against Tim Farron, the media (including social media) are off again. This time the target firmly in their sights is back-bench Tory MP, Jacob Rees-Mogg.  Asked on GMB for his views he answered clearly and unambiguously (which is more than can be said for the average politician) that he was against abortion under any circumstances and that he did not believe in same-sex marriage. Continue reading

Marriage, Abortion and Euthanasia are public matters not just private choices

Yesterday I wrote about why Christians should and could be involved in public life. I wrote in the context of Tim Farron’s resignation as Liberal Democrat leader.

The root of Farron’s resignation can be found in a series of interviews he gave at the start of the General Election campaign. Farron was pushed hard to say whether or not he believed being gay and/or gay sex was a sin.

Farron’s initial defence and that of his supporters was that his religious beliefs about moral questions were a private matter and did not impinge on his public role as leader of the Liberal Democrats.  Farron eventually stated that he did not think gay sex was a sin. However, I think he would have wanted to say that the principle he had argued still stood. Farron was also challenged about his views on abortion.  Could he as a Christian see abortion as wrong whilst leading a party that supported it as representing a woman’s right to choose. Continue reading

Why Evangelical Christians can and should be involved in public life

Yesterday, Tim Farron resigned as leader of the Liberal Democrats explaining that he felt “torn between living as a faithful Christian and serving as a political leader”[1]

Today, people are asking whether or not Christians who believe the Bible’s teaching on moral matters such as abortion and same-sex marriage can still be involved in public life or whether their view now in effect bar them from mainstream politics and high office. Continue reading

Leadership lessons from #GE2017

I promised some practical lessons for leaders from the General Election. This is because whatever we think about the specific political qualities of different candidates and parties, there’s a lot we can learn about leadership both from what they do well and what they do badly. Continue reading

Can we talk about sin?

So, the General Election campaign is off and one of the first big questions of the campaign is “Does Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat party leader) think that it is a sin to be gay?”[1] Continue reading