The urban challenge – urban mobility

One of the challenges of urban ministry is the mobility of people coming into and then leaving a community. It means that someone may turn up  and be around for a couple of weeks, couple of months or couple of years. Continue reading

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The dilemma you don’t need to have

So, one of the dilemmas people sometimes struggle with when thinking about urban mission is that they want to communicate the Gospel and that means teaching the Bible but that means using words, reading, speaking to the mind and will that end up being intellectual and not speaking to those we want to reach.  Continue reading

Send us people to train and we’ll send them back … or on

This is an appeal to church leaders.  Is there someone in your congregation that you should be encouraging to train for pastoral ministry?  You see, whilst often the conversation starts with the individual experience a sense of calling and beginning to ask questions, look at courses, respond to adverts etc actually, pastors, missionaries and church planters need to be set apart, commissioned and sent and to a great extent the responsibility for encouraging people down this route lies with church elders.

If there is someone who might be ready to gain training and experience then will you consider sending them to train with us?

During their time with us they will: Continue reading

Urban Idolatry

It used to be said that pet owners begin to look like their animals. I don’t know if that is really true, however, it has also been said that we (as individuals and as a society) begin to look like and behave like our idols. Continue reading

Move us into action

A few weeks back the Bishop of Burnley went to the New Wine Conference and challenged the hearers on their attitude to the poor.  There was a bit of media reaction and a bit more social media reaction.  Continue reading

Journey into urban mission (part 1)

Last week the Bishop of Burnley challenged visitors to the New Wine festival about mission to the poor. His charge was that the church had forgotten the poor and that event the recent upturn in church planting was primarily in student and wealthy areas. Continue reading